Sunday, September 25, 2016

Book Review: Ruin and Rising (The Grisha Trilogy, Book 3), by Leigh Bardugo

Ruin and Rising (The Grisha Trilogy, book 3)
By: Leigh Bardugo
www.LeighBardugo.com
www.GrishaTrilogy.com
ISBN-10: 080509461X
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With Alina’s powers gone and her whole motley crew trapped underground, everything is looking pretty hopeless. Alina knows she needs to escape her prison of darkness, regain back her powers, and find Nikolai Lantsov—if he’s even alive, that is—to defeat the Darkling.

Ruin and Rising is a satisfying conclusion to The Grisha Trilogy, and fans of the previous books should be especially pleased with the ending.

It includes:

• Kissing
• Sex scene (non-descriptive)
• Violence (deaths, mentions of blood)
• Minor profanity (d*mn, *ss)


More Grisha Trilogy reviews:
Book 1: Shadow and Bone
Book 2: Siege and Storm
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Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Book Review: Bound by Flames (Night Prince, book 3), by Jeaniene Frost

Bound by Flames (Night Prince, book 3)
By: Jeaniene Frost
ISBN: 0062076086
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As the war with their greatest enemy begins hitting much closer to home, Leila is left wondering if she'll be around to see the outcome. Will even Vlad's abilities be enough to keep them both safe? 

Bound by Flames is decidedly darker than its two predecessors. The story deals with themes of control, forgiveness, and mercy.

Bound by Flames is an adult, paranormal romance and contains:
  • Profanity (Sh*t, f word, wh*re, etc) 
  • References to someone skinned alive 
  • Rape like situations 
  • References to child rape 
  • Reference to murder of baby  
  • Various burnings of living people  
  • Death, injury and torture 
  • Sex scenes (oral sex included)


Readers working their way chronologically through the Night Huntress Universe books will appreciate the post Up From the Grave cameo of Cat and Bones. 


More Night Prince Novels 
  1. Once Burned
  2. Twice Tempted
  3. Bound By Flames
  4. Into the Fire
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Monday, September 19, 2016

Book Review: Rebel Belle (Rebel Belle, Book 1), by Rachel Hawkins

Rebel Belle (Rebel Belle, book 1)
By: Rachel Hawkins
ReadingWritingRachel.blogspot.com
ISBN-10: 0399256938
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Harper Price is a southern belle. She has impeccable manners, drinks tea, and always wears the perfect outfit. Lately, due to her new job as a guardian, she’s also been busy beating up magical bad guys.

So who is the lucky person she’s sworn to protect? David Stark, an Oracle, Harper’s school classmate, and also her number-one enemy since childhood.

Harper is shocked when she realizes she’s falling for David, and things get even more out of hand when a deadly prophecy is issued, and a string of villains are suddenly out to get David.

It contains:

• Profanity (bullsh*t, douchebag, *ss, references to the F-word)
• Violence (some deaths, one person is stabbed by a stiletto, kicking and punching—the violence is quite cartoonish)
• References to sex
• Kissing
• References to drugs and alcohol

Rebel Belle is a fun YA paranormal romance novel. It contains the same light humor as in Hex Hall, but this book by the same author is slightly more mature.


Readers who enjoyed Rebel Belle might also like:


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Monday, September 12, 2016

Book Review: The Night Gardener, by Jonathan Auxier

The Night Gardener
By: Jonathan Auxier
www.TheScop.com
ISBN-10: 141971144X
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Two young orphaned siblings named Molly and Kip get a new job as servants working for the Windsors at their mysterious mansion. But little do they know is that there are more dangers at the manor than they ever could have suspected.

It includes:

• Some very suspenseful and frightening scenes
• Murder
• A supernatural being drains the life out of several characters
• Minor profanity (d*mn, h*ll)
• Two older men make brief lewd comments to a young girl
• A married couple shares a kiss
• A woman drinks wine
• A man smells of “ale and tobacco”

The Night Gardener is a spooky middle grade standalone that might be too much for timid younger children to handle. Readers will cheer for the main characters as Molly and Kip bravely face one perilous escapade after another. The ending is satisfying, if a bit abrupt, and the creative plot is engaging.

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Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Book Review: Impulse (Impulse, Book 1), by Ellen Hopkins

Impulse (Impulse, book 1)
By: Ellen Hopkins
www.EllenHopkins.com
ISBN-10: 0606125973
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Vanessa, Tony, and Conner all have something in common: they each tried to commit suicide. Sent to Aspen Springs, a psychiatric hospital, the three teens have no hope of recovering from their past traumatizing lives . . . that is, until they meet each other.

It contains:

• Profanity (including the F-word)
• Kissing
• References to sex, sexual abuse, sleeping with a teacher, and an abortion
• Suicide
• Descriptions of past attempted suicide
• Reference to a murder
• A character cuts herself
• A character is bipolar
• A character thinks he’s gay
• Many characters are on medication
• Reference to past drug use

Impulse is the gritty first book in a two-part duology. It is written in free verse, and the tales the characters tell about their lives are very dark. Not recommended for young or immature readers.

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Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Book Review: The Cure for Dreaming, by Cat Winters

The Cure for Dreaming
By: Cat Winters
www.CatWinters.com
ISBN-10: 1419712160
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In the year 1900, Olivia Mead is a suffragist—an independent young lady who fights for women’s rights. Her father plans to cure her of her “rebellious” ways by hiring a hypnotist to manipulate her thinking process, but Olivia is too stubborn to let some mystical acts change her mind.

The Cure for Dreaming is a young adult historical fiction novel with some paranormal and romance elements. This book deals with the mistreatment of women in the time era, and portrays the idea of women being confined to housework and taking care of children for the rest of their lives, and husbands thinking for their wives, negatively.

Parents should be aware that it contains:

• Minor profanity
• Kissing
• Violence (references to beating women, a character is extremely ill, a woman is hypnotized against her will)
• Some descriptions of people looking like monsters (not really scary, but might disturb younger readers)
• References suggesting sex
• Drinking and smoking

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Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Book Review: The Declaration (The Declaration, Book 1), by Gemma Malley

The Declaration (The Declaration, book 1)
By: Gemma Malley
www.GemmaMalley.com
ISBN-10: 1599901196
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In the year 2140, everyone has signed the Declaration, agreeing not to have any children. In exchange, they are given drugs that prevent any illnesses and give people a long-lasting life.

Surplus Anna is a teenager who was illegally born, and lives in Grange Hall, where she and all the other Surplus children are treated like slaves. Anna’s life seems hopelessly laid out before her, until one day a new boy arrives at the institute named Peter.

The Declaration is a young adult dystopian novel with an intriguing concept and a fast-moving plot. It contains:

• Violence (shooting, deaths, fleeing from authorities, slapping, children playing cruel games)
• Minor profanity
• Kissing


Readers who enjoyed The Declaration might also like Unwind, by Neal Shusterman and:


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Monday, August 15, 2016

Book Review: Hunger (Gone Series, Book 2), by Michael Grant

Hunger (Gone Series, book 2)
By: Michael Grant
TheMichaelGrant.com
ISBN-10: 0061449067
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Three months after the FAYZ first broke out, causing everyone over the age of fourteen to disappear, the teens of Perdido Beach are still struggling to survive. With each day proving more difficult than the last, kids everywhere are discovering they have new supernatural powers, and everyone is starving. Meanwhile, Caine is still trying to take the leadership duty from Sam, and a manipulative creature called the Darkness is waiting, hidden in a cave in the mountains. . . .

Hunger is a gripping sequel to the science fiction dystopian book Gone. It contains about the same amount of violence and profanity as the first book, but the plot is slightly darker and there is more character development. It includes:

• Profanity (*ss, d*mn, h*ll, and God)
• A character is anorexic and bulimic
• Kissing
• Some minor sexual references
• A character is homosexual and has a crush on someone of the same gender
• One character drinks beer (he is a teenager)
• Violence (fighting, deaths, reference to cannibalism, some gory details) Best Blogger Tips

Friday, August 5, 2016

Book Review: Living Dead Girl, by Elizabeth Scott

Living Dead Girl
By: Elizabeth Scott
www.ElizabethWrites.com
ISBN-10: 1416960597
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A girl is kidnapped when she is just ten years old by middle-aged Ray, who renames her Alice. Five years later Ray is still sexually and mentally abusing Alice, and he keeps her in line by threatening to kill her family. Alice dreams of the day she might escape Ray . . . until one day she begins to form a plan.

It includes:

• Kidnapping
• A man plans to kidnap a young girl
• A teen girl is forced to have sex with an older man against her will (some description)
• A teen girl’s food is rationed against her will and she is very hungry
• A teen girl performs oral sex on a teen boy
• Profanity (including the F-word)
• A teen girl gets her private area waxed
• Violent behavior
• Death threats
• A character’s arm is cut
• Lying
• Death

Living Dead Girl is an extremely depressing, disturbing, and realistic take on child kidnapping. The book is hard to put down and a quick read, even though the main theme is hard to handle and might make some readers squeamish.


Those who enjoyed Living Dead Girl might also like:

The Chosen One, by Carol Lynch Williams
Boy Toy, by Barry Lyga
Impulse, by Ellen Hopkins

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Thursday, July 28, 2016

Book Review: Don’t Look Back, by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Don’t Look Back
By: Jennifer L. Armentrout
www.JenniferArmentrout.com
ISBN-10: 1423175123
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Sam wakes up on the side of a road covered in blood, her memory completely blank.

After she is thrown back into a life she can’t remember, Sam learns the disturbing truth: her best friend, Cassie, is dead, and the police suspect she was murdered. Already having to deal with the confusion of her memory loss, new questions are now whirling around Sam’s head: Who killed Cassie? What’s up with the strange way her family is acting? And why does she have a bad feeling about her old boyfriend?

Don’t Look Back is a fast-paced mystery thriller that contains some mature themes. It includes:

• Physical attraction
• Kissing and making out
• A sex scene (non-descriptive)
• Reference to a character giving her boyfriend oral sex
• Profanity (one F-word, b*tch, sh*t, h*ll, and d*mn)
• Some creepy hallucinations
• Depictions of a murder
• Blood
• A fistfight

Don’t Look Back should not disappoint Jennifer L. Armentrout fans, and even those who are not a fan of the author’s other works might find this YA standalone to be surprisingly enjoyable (though it can be quite cheesy at times).


Readers who enjoyed Don’t Look Back might also like:

There Will Be Lies, by Nick Lake

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